Navigant Research Blog

Innovation Is Booming in the Water Industry

— April 9, 2014

As part of the events to mark World Water Day, the United Nations (UN) has launched a new report highlighting the challenges of ensuring an adequate global water supply over the coming decade.  In particular, the World Water Development Report focuses on the growing interdependency of water and energy.  The report looks at the water industry’s energy requirements for production, distribution, and treatment, as well as at the growing demand for water resources from the energy industry.

We have written about the impact of the growing global demand for water before, but the World Water Development Report yet again highlights the challenges ahead.  According to the report, water demand will increase by 55% by 2050, with the biggest impact coming from the growing demand from manufacturing (400%), thermal electricity generation (140%), and domestic use (130%).  More than 40% of the global population is projected to be living in areas of severe water stress through 2050.

Countries, cities, and communities need to improve their ability to assess and plan for future water needs.  However, developing new water supplies, storage facilities, or treatment plants will remain a hugely expensive endeavor, and so the industry must look to technologies that can mitigate the need for capital investment by improving the efficiency of existing systems and maximizing the benefits of new investments.  For this reason, we are seeing a host of innovative technologies and solutions targeted at the water industry.  Entrepreneurs and developers from the IT, telecom, and smart grid sectors are now looking to water as the next industry where they can make a major impact on the way the business operates.  This opportunity is attracting a wide range of technology and service suppliers, including established water metering vendors, water network engineering companies, water service companies, infrastructure providers, IT software and service companies, and a variety of startups and innovators.

The recent World Water-Tech Investment Summit in London gave me a good opportunity to survey a range of companies.  Among a host of other innovators at the show were companies we looked at in our Smart Water Networks report, including TaKaDu, which has been pioneering the use of cloud-based analytics for leak detection.  Also present was i2O, which is providing water utilities with an intelligent pressure management solution that also uses cloud-based advanced analytics, but integrates them directly into the pressure management system.  Other companies new to me included Acoustic Sensing, a U.K. startup that has developed a new acoustic sensing solution to allow the rapid identification of structural defects and blockages in sewerage systems; Syrinix, another U.K. company that provides intelligent pipe monitoring systems for burst detection and pressure monitoring, among other applications; IOSight, an Israeli-based company providing advanced business intelligence and data management for the water industry; and Optiqua, which provides sensor networks for real-time water quality monitoring.

Keeping Afloat

While there is no shortage of innovation in the industry, it is still a challenge to find ways of investing in new technologies in a heavily regulated industry.  With no stimulus funding or mandated smart meter rollouts to boost the market, the industry needs to find other ways to finance innovation.  One option is the use of a software-as-a-service (SaaS) model to defer capital expenditures and reduce resource needs.  For example, both TaKaDu and i20 provide their software as a cloud-based service.  Innovative approaches to regulatory and investment programs will also be important.  In the United Kingdom, OFWAT is currently working with the country’s water utilities on the next regulatory pricing period, to run from 2015 to 2020.  The aim is to increase the ability of utilities to invest in water metering and other networks’ management technologies.

The smart water market is attracting a wide range of new players and presenting established players with the opportunity to expand their business into new areas.  Both sets of players face challenges in an industry that is hungry for change but also conservative in its operations and restricted in its financial options.  As stated in our Smart Water Networks report, while there are strong drivers for growth, the challenges of transforming a conservative industry faced with a physically and technically challenging deployment environment mean that the growth in this market will always be steady rather than explosive.  However, the direction of travel is clear.

 

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