Navigant Research Blog

Navigant’s 2017 Mid-Year Energy Market Outlook: Ongoing Drivers and Cutting-Edge Trends in North American Energy Market

— August 31, 2017

Industry trends and uncertainties continue to transform the North American energy market. Examples include increased renewables in the power sector, technological innovation in energy storage, shifting supply and demand patterns in the natural gas market, and environmental policy uncertainty due to the administration change. Navigant’s 2017 Mid-Year Energy Outlook (NEMO) analyzes how these trends and others are expected to affect the energy and capacity mix as well as market prices over the next 24 years.

Energy Demand

The rate of growth in energy consumption and peak demand has decreased in recent years despite an increase in economic growth. The United States and Canada appear to be transitioning from the long-term trend where growth in energy consumption closely tracked economic growth. While NEMO forecasts overall growth in both consumption and peak demand, the levels of growth (as well as energy efficiency and other demand-side resources) vary between regions. For example, Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) and parts of Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) are among the faster growing regions in the forecast. However, New York, New England, and PJM are expected to see lower levels of growth, leading to a slowdown in generation additions. This marks a shift in PJM, where coal retirements, the capacity market, and low natural gas prices have driven the construction of many new merchant natural gas combined cycle power plants in recent years.

Renewable Energy Growth

Despite the absence of a carbon policy, Navigant expects that solar installations will continue to grow in North America as costs decline—though not as steeply as in recent history—and as the technology continues to be pushed by state policies and consumers. In 2016, the United States installed 14.8 GW of solar PV projects, second only to China for annual installations that year. The wind forecast is more dependent on the federal Production Tax Credit that is already declining and set to expire by 2020. This has led to a boom in construction that is expected to peak in 2020 (the last year projects can go online and still get 100% of the tax credit) before declining steeply.

The convergence of increasing renewables penetration and declining battery costs indicates that battery storage is likely on the precipice of increased deployment across the electric grid for renewables integration and the provision of ancillary services. For the first time, Navigant’s NEMO includes an energy storage addition outlook. Energy storage is being implemented in areas such as California to meet policy targets without adding significant new natural gas generation. The revenue that storage projects would expect to receive from avoiding curtailment of renewables is not yet enough to cover the overnight cost of storage, though this could change in the future as the costs of storage decline and renewables penetration increases.

Natural Gas Market Transformation

While the power market grapples with the evolving energy generation mix and the associated effects on the grid, the natural gas market in North America continues its own evolution characterized by threshold events. Exports of natural gas have overtaken imports into the country for the first time in 60 years. US natural gas pipeline exports to Mexico have more than quadrupled since 2010. Exports by ship occurred for the first time from the lower 48 states, with the Cheniere Sabine Pass liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility delivering LNG to the world market in February 2016. From this point forward, at least to the end of the NEMO term in 2040, Navigant expects exports by pipeline and by ship to continue increasing. Exports are anticipated to grow to represent over 18% of the US natural gas market by 2040.

Navigant’s NEMO covers the changing supply and demand dynamics in the natural gas market, continued renewables generation buildout, slowing load growth, the introduction of emerging technologies like storage, and the continued absence of a federal carbon policy. David Walls and Rob Patrylak will present further details on Navigant’s forecast via a webinar on September 13.

 

Wind Project Construction Hits Record Pace Mid-Year

— August 31, 2017

The US wind market is in the midst of a wind plant construction boom. As of early August, 25,819 MW of wind projects were in various stages of advanced development or construction, according to the American Wind Energy Association’s (AWEA’s) U.S. Wind Industry Second Quarter 2017 Market Report. This represents a 41% increase in under construction projects over the same quarter in 2016 and the largest amount ever recorded by AWEA. The remarkable increase is the result of the long-term phaseout of the wind industry’s favored incentive, the Production Tax Credit (PTC).

The extension, which was secured by the industry through negotiations with Congress, is structured so that wind plants that began construction by the end of 2016 will receive 100% PTC value. Projects starting construction in 2017 will receive 80% of the PTC value, and the percentage will continue to decline through 2020 (2018: 60%; 2019: 40%; 2020: 0%). Most importantly, revised guidance provided by the IRS in May 2016 changed the construction window from 2 to 4 years. Therefore, projects on the tail end of the PTC window will be finishing construction through 2023.

Most companies seeking the maximum financial return on their wind projects aim to qualify their projects as having started in 2016 or 2017. The bar to qualify for start construction is not very high, which is one reason why so many projects are in various stages of advanced development and construction. To be considered under construction, a wind project developer must have started work of a significant nature on the project site or signed turbine or other equipment supply agreements representing at least 5% of the total expected project cost.

The Big Three

Other key highlights from AWEA’s quarterly report include an update to the installed capacity in 2017: a modest 357 MW during Q2 and 2,357 MW year-to-date. This brings the US total to 84,405 MW, with more than 52,000 turbines operating in over 41 states. The turbine vendor market share represented by installations so far in 2017 reinforces an ongoing trend: the big three turbine OEMs, Vestas, General Electric, and the recently merged Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE), represented 97% of all turbines installed in the first half of 2017.

Intense competition has led some vendors to reduce supply chain and manufacturing commitments in the US market. However, this is not a market that can be competitively sourced via a high proportion of imported supply chain. Massive towers, blades, and the nacelle drivetrain componentry ideally are manufactured within the country. The big three continue to have outsized commitments to domestic manufacturing or sourcing from vendors based in the United States, an approach that secures their substantial market shares.

Power Purchase Agreements

Corporate purchases of wind power and other renewables capacity continue to be a major trend exhibited in AWEA’s quarterly report. Power purchase agreements (PPAs) signed during the first half of 2017 totaled 1,697 MW; 37% of that capacity was through direct corporate purchase where companies like Apple, General Mills, T-Mobile, and others contracted PPAs. Notably, direct utility ownership represented 45% of capacity in advanced development. Direct utility ownership of wind plants has typically represented a low percentage of installed capacity. Yet, utilities are motivated to buy directly into wind when it is on a sale that is eventually going to subside.

Future US quarterly market reports can be found at AWEA’s market report link. Also worth noting is that AWEA recently launched an interactive map that tracks the growing number of wind projects online and the hundreds of manufacturing facilities supported by the wind industry.

 

Energy Storage to Optimize and Advance CHP Generators

— August 31, 2017

Energy storage is often associated only with the integration of renewable energy. However, recent market developments have highlighted the potential for storage to optimize both existing and new fossil fueled generators. While large-scale pumped hydro energy storage has been used on the grid for decades, those systems were rarely tied directly to any generation plants. A recent storage project built by General Electric in California is evidence that the falling costs for battery storage are opening opportunities to improve the efficiency and flexibility of existing generators.

There are attractive advantages for energy storage to optimize generators at a smaller scale. Gas-powered combined heat and power (CHP) systems are becoming increasingly popular due to the improved efficiency these systems offer customers that need a reliable supply of both heat and electricity. Because of the varying energy needs of these customers and the dynamics of CHP systems operation, there is frequently an overgeneration of either electricity or heat. This energy is often wasted, as establishing contracts that export excess energy is costly and challenging. Both thermal and electrical energy storage systems can greatly reduce wasted energy when tied to CHP systems and can provide attractive ROI for customers.

Industry Actions

Several recent acquisitions in the industry have emphasized this dynamic. In a recent blog, my colleague Adam Forni discusses these developments and the efforts of generator manufacturers to expand their offerings and participate in the emerging Energy Cloud. Notable recent investments in storage providers include Wärtsilä’s purchase of Greensmith and Aggreko’s acquisition of Younicos.

In both cases, incumbent generator providers moved to acquire storage companies focused on the software and controls required to optimize storage systems and integrate them into electricity markets. These tie-ups are mutually beneficial, as the storage providers gain access to new sales channels and potential new customers. The generator providers are likely focusing on developing the capabilities to integrate storage into their offerings and utilize new combined solutions to provide energy and capacity services in competitive electricity markets. The additional revenue generated by these grid services can greatly improve the overall economics of new storage and microgrid projects, including those that expand the capabilities of existing generators.

Into the Future  

The move toward microgrids and local power systems to improve the resilience of energy supply is an important driver for the integration of energy storage with conventional generators. Navigant Research’s recent Market Data: Combined Heat and Power in Microgrids report anticipates that 11.3 GW of new CHP capacity will be added in microgrids around the world over the next decade. The addition of these systems presents a major opportunity for both thermal and electrical energy storage to improve overall efficiency. Through the integration of energy storage and the sophisticated software platforms used to connect to energy markets, large amounts of new distributed energy capacity will become available on the grid.

 

Can Solar Make an Impact on the Transportation Market? Part 1

— August 31, 2017

People have dreamed of solar-powered vehicles for decades. The first World Solar Challenge race occurred in 1987 and the first American Solar Challenge (then called Sunrayce) was held in 1990.

Thanks to improvements in solar costs and the EV value chain, the dream is closer to reality. Two startups (Sono Motors in Munich, Germany and Lightyear in Eindhoven, the Netherlands) have projects underway. Sono Motors successfully crowdfunded more than half a million dollars in September 2016 and revealed its first car on July 27, 2017: the Sion. According to Sono, the Sion will cost between $13,200 and $17,600 depending on the battery size and will run without refueling for around 30 km with a 1 kW solar system. It will be available in 2019.

Lightyear is an unofficial spinoff from Solar Team Eindhoven. This team built the Stella and Stella Lux solar racers—both winners of the Bridgestone World Solar Challenge Cruiser Class. The cruiser class replicates traditional cars, with seating space for four people. Lightyear has been taking preorders since June 29, 2017 for €119,000 ($138,000). The car is expected to offer a range between 400 km and 800 km and travel between 10,000 km and 20,000 km per year in low irradiation areas (e.g., United Kingdom and the Netherlands)—charging only with its PV system.

Today’s Solar-Powered Vehicle Option

A solar-powered vehicle option is available on the market today. Toyota’s latest Prius Prime Plug-in Hybrid offers an option in Japan to add a 180W solar roof that charges the main battery. Toyota claims that the roof will give the car a maximum solar rage of 6 km in Japan, which is a country with medium irradiance levels. The option to add the solar roof costs $2,500, which adds 5%-10% to the vehicle price. This seems expensive given the savings it provides compared to buying electricity from the grid that costs below $70 per year, even with the high electricity prices in Japan. From a convenience point of view, the system might make more sense for people without parking at home and short daily drives. My daily commute is around 4 km, which means that if I had the Prius Prime Plug-in Hybrid with the 180W solar roof add-on, I could drive mostly electric all year without visiting a charging point. It is still an expensive feature, however, which is why most mobility analysts—like my colleague Scott Shepard, who analyzes the EV market—have been skeptical about the idea of putting solar and EVs together. Yet, other automakers are exploring the PV-EV connection, as well. Audi has just announced it will unveil a prototype EV with solar panels on the roof to extend the vehicle range.

Despite the skepticism, one successful solar-powered vehicle project exists. Part 2 of this blog series will look into Indian Railways’ newly launched solar diesel multiple unit trains.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"2017 August","path":"\/2017\/08","date":"11\/22\/2017"}