Navigant Research Blog

UK Cities Are Embedding Smart City Principles in City Policy

— November 7, 2017

My previous blog summarized five of the Innovation Awards spotlighted in the UK Smart Cities Index 2017, commissioned by Huawei, which assess the 20 leading smart cities in the UK. Those awards focused on five key smart city service areas: transportation, health, energy, education, and public safety. Equally important are the cross-sector strategies and technology investments that enable innovation across these service areas.

Four other Innovation Awards identify key strategic and technical areas where UK cities are making significant contributions to the development of smart city policies and infrastructure:

Sustainability: Cities are making sustainability the heart of city policy, as they recognize the need to reduce their environmental footprint and contribute to the global reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. Peterborough takes the Innovation Award for its environmental focus and commitment to becoming a circular city, as exemplified in the Share Peterborough programme for resource sharing. Also commended are Bristol, European Green Capital in 2016; London, which has launched an ambitious new environmental policy; and Manchester, which has set a goal of being a zero carbon city by 2050.

Internet of Things (IoT): UK cities are looking to establish a large-scale test bed environment that can support a rolling programme of innovation projects. Bristol Is Open continues to lead the way in terms of its scope and ambition and the contribution it is making to the city’s broader plans. Other leading examples include Manchester’s CityVerve IoT demonstrator, Milton Keynes’ MK:Smart, and Cambridge’s new LoRa-based intelligent city platform.

Data and analytics: All the cities included in this report are looking at how to use data to improve services and boost innovation. London continues to be at the forefront on data innovation with its London Office of Data Analytics and a new Chief Digital Officer accelerating the use of data to improve services across the capital. Leeds also deserves mention as one of the pioneers for open data in the UK with Data Mill North, just one of several data-focused initiatives in the city.

Strategy: The successful adoption of new technologies to improve city services requires cities to rethink the way they design, manage, and operate city services in the digital age. All the leading cities are taking a fresh view on the impact of technology on city policy making, planning, and service design. The Innovation Award goes to Aberdeen for its new Target Operating Model, which seeks to embed smart city thinking into city planning, service design, and infrastructure investment. This will be enabled by new approaches to the provision of digital infrastructure and services.

The 10th Innovation Award is for City Partner and reflects the importance of central government and other agencies in fostering collaboration between cities and supporting follower cities as they develop smart city initiatives. The Future Cities Catapult is having a strong influence across the country by helping cities initiate smart city programmes, share ideas and insight, develop common standards, and accelerate innovation in areas like smart planning.

These Innovation Awards demonstrate the range of activity occurring across UK cities. In my next blog, I will examine some of broader insights to be drawn from Navigant Research’s efforts for the report and its conversations with city leaders.

 

Bristol Claims Top Spot as UK Cities Step Up Innovation Programmes

— November 3, 2017

The UK Smart Cities Index 2017, commissioned by Huawei, provides a timely review of the progress of smart cities in the UK and offers insights for urban innovation projects around the world. Bristol gains the top spot in the new index, a reflection of the city’s continued investment in programmes such as Bristol Is Open and the growing integration between innovation projects with the city’s operations. The city exemplifies the way smart city concepts are gradually being embedded at the heart of city policy. While Bristol edges ahead of London this year, the UK capital is also showing a strong commitment to driving smart city innovation, notably with the recent appointment of a new Chief Digital Officer. Following the two Leaders is a strong group of Contenders led by Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Milton Keynes, Glasgow, and Nottingham.

Innovation Highlights

The scope of work being done across the UK is highlighted in the report in a series of Innovation Awards that showcase leadership in 10 areas. The first five awards focus on specific areas of city services:

Transportation: Many UK cities are looking at technologies to reduce congestion and transport-related emissions, and Milton Keynes stands out for its range of projects and its close alignment with the city’s broader strategy for growth. Its initiatives include mobility apps, EV and automated vehicles, and a new citywide intelligent traffic light management system.

Health: Supporting aging populations and reducing health inequalities, notably in terms of differences in life expectation between communities, are high priorities. Leeds is a leader among UK cities in exploring the possibilities of more integrated approaches to health and social care, the role of technologies in supporting people throughout their lives, and the importance of data in improving health outcomes.

Energy: As Navigant Research has highlighted, energy is an increasingly important issue for many cities in the UK and elsewhere. Not only is energy policy a key element in any broader sustainability target, it is also closely connected to transport, housing, and health policies. Among several cities driving new energy programmes, Nottingham gains the Innovation Award for its city-owned energy company, foundational energy projects, and new community energy schemes exploring the use of solar and storage solutions.

Education: One of the significant trends identified in the study is the closer relationship developing between local government and the university sector. Among the cities working in new ways with their universities to drive smart city projects are Bristol, Cambridge, and Oxford. But the Innovation Award goes to Newcastle for the role the University of Newcastle has taken in the establishment of Newcastle City Futures and in directing and supporting a range of digital programmes in the city—as well as the establishment of the Science Central facility.

Public Safety: As most UK cities have already deployed extensive closed-circuit TV systems, the focus is now on coordination and the better use of video analysis and other forms of analytics. Glasgow has led the way in the creation of a new city operations centre, the showcase development from its smart city demonstrator award.

Cities are exploring the potential for new technologies in each of these service areas, they also realise the need to join up these programmes through more holistic approaches and the development of common platforms. In my next blog, I will look at the cities leading the way in these areas.

 

Realizing the Potential of Street Lighting Networks

— July 27, 2017

Navigant Research expects 73 million connected street lights to be deployed globally by 2026. This will be an immense asset for cities able to use these smart nodes as part of an emerging city mesh of sensors and smart devices. However, while the potential of smart street lighting is clear, there are still several hurdles to faster adoption. As Richelle Elberg noted in a new Echelon-sponsored white paper, we must examine the complex issues around the network choices facing cities—and technical complexities are only part of the problem. The Echelon white paper and Navigant Research’s recent Smart Street Lighting for Smart Cities report both identify five key messages for cities as they consider their street lighting policy:

  • Consider street lighting upgrades as part of an Internet of Things (IoT) strategy. Any city looking to deploy a street lighting network should at least have an outlined plan for how it will engage with the growth in the use of digital and IoT technologies for city operations and services. How do these developments fit with existing city development strategies? What are the priority local issues and what are the local assets that provide the starting point and make the plan distinct to the needs of this city?
  • Find new ways to collaborate across departments. The potential to add future services to a street lighting network means that coordination across city departments on procurement is essential. Restricting the procurement to the traditional concerns of the lighting department may limit the ability to realize future benefits. Coordination of networking requirements and procurement across multiple city departments—and even involvement of other stakeholders such as local utilities—should be considered.
  • Think about problems first. While there are a wide range of potential use cases for a multi-application network, not all will have the same priority. Just because many applications can be supported on a street lighting network does not mean that all will be equally important to all cities. As a leader of a successful smart city program recently said: “our secret is that we always start with a city problem not a technology.”
  • Understand the diversity of requirements. While integration across departments and the consolidation of requirements is a sensible approach, it is also important to realize that one approach will not satisfy all needs. Most cities are likely to require different communication solutions to address the span of smart city applications, from low risk Living Lab projects, to specific services applications such as street lighting and smart parking, to critical city systems for public safety. The future of city networking will be a hybrid.
  • Recognize that street lights are a city asset. In a world that depends on ubiquitous access to power and connectivity, the street lighting network is a valuable resource. In addition to providing a platform for new sensors and applications to improve the efficiency of city services, they can also be a source of new revenue. Street lighting poles are being used to extend cellular and Wi-Fi access, to integrate EV charging equipment, and as digital signage sites for advertisers.

Where Do We Go from Here?

Installing smart controls for street lighting at the same time as an LED upgrade program is a logical and cost-effective step to enhancing the value of the city lighting system. In 2017, smart street lights represent only about 2% of the installed base of street lights; there is still immense potential for better utilization of these valuable city assets.

Installed Base of Smart Street Lights by Region, World Markets: 2017-2026

(Source: Navigant Research)

For further detail on smart city applications, street lighting as a platform, and the relevant connectivity platforms, see the Navigant Research white paper, Smart Street Lighting as a Smart City Platform. The Executive Summary from the Smart Street Lighting for Smart Cities report is also available.

 

San Diego Aims to Set the Pace for Smart City Networks

— April 21, 2017

The announcement by the City of San Diego that it will deploy over 3,000 smart sensors as part of an ambitious upgrade to its street lighting system provides evidence that we are on the cusp of a new phase for smart street lighting and city networks.

As part of an upgrade to 14,000 city lights, San Diego will deploy 3,200 of GE’s Current CityIQ sensor nodes to create a multi-application city Internet of Things (IoT) network. The intelligent nodes can support a range of applications, including gunshot detection, smart parking, air quality sensing, and vehicle and pedestrian monitoring. Deployment of the platform and fixtures is expected to begin in July and to be completed before the end of 2018. The upgrade is expected to save the city $2.4 million annually in energy costs.

Platform for Innovation

As well as supporting a number of smart city applications, San Diego is also looking at the network to provide a broader platform for innovation. According to David Graham, San Diego’s deputy chief operating officer, the goal is to allow the community “to put their hands on the heartbeat and nervous system of the city is our way of building a smart city app store.” Delivering on this vision will put San Diego at the leading edge of smart city innovations.

The project fits with broader trends in the smart city market. The benefits of LED lighting are now widely understood by cities and many also recognize the value of providing network connections to those lamp poles (even if local finances and politics can still be a barrier to actual adoption). There is strong evidence that smart street lighting is crossing the chasm to becoming a mainstream technology.

However, the use of street lighting networks as a multi-application platform for smart city development has yet to make that leap. Today, deploying and managing a connected street lighting network is challenging enough for many lighting and public works departments. They need to ensure this upgrade goes smoothly and that significant benefits are provided to the city in terms of cost savings and improved lighting services. In this context, implementing additional sensor applications is not a priority. In addition, the business case for implementing these secondary applications is harder to develop, involves the scoping of new projects, and requires buy-in from a wider range of stakeholders. For these reasons, most cities still see the deployment of additional application on their street lighting network as a pilot project, at best.

Lighting the Way

However, there are signs that these issues are being overcome. San Diego aims to lead the way, but it is not alone. Cities like Copenhagen, which is deploying a street lighting platform from Silver Spring Networks, and Eindhoven, working on an innovative lighting strategy with Philips, are also in the advanced guard—among others. As other cities gain confidence from the experience of these leading adopters, smart street lighting will move into its most exciting phase yet.

For further discussion about some of the most exciting developments in smart cities, please join us for the upcoming free webinar from Navigant Research, Smart Cities and the Energy Transformation, on April 25 at noon EDT. Click here to register.

 

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