Navigant Research Blog

Adapting to the New Demand Response Landscape

Brett Feldman — January 27, 2015

Demand response (DR) was first employed in the United States the 1970s.  At that time, DR was implemented as a component of the energy conservation focus of demand-side management (DSM) programs to encourage consumers to use less electricity during peak hours or to shift their energy use to off-peak times.  Utilities have run residential direct load control programs as forms of demand management and offered interruptible rates to commercial and industrial customers for many years.

Today, however, the electric grid needs resources beyond just meeting peak demand situations, requiring more flexibility and faster response.  A number of drivers point toward increased DR adoption by utilities and grid operators around the world.  The changing resource mix in electric grids globally is creating more potential for DR to play a pivotal role.  As coal and nuclear plants retire due to economic or environmental factors, clean replacements are needed that can be built in short timeframes.  Conversely, as large-scale intermittent renewable resources like wind and solar power fill in this gap, they require backup solutions when the wind is not blowing and the sun is not shining.

New Training Course

At the same time, new market types, including ancillary services such as spinning reserves and frequency regulation, are opening up to DR.  The concepts of resilience and microgrids have taken strong root along the Atlantic Coast following Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and DR will be an integral part of those developments.  The advent of grid modernization is also tied to this new view on how the grid should be designed.  With the proliferation of advanced meters that can record usage at very small intervals, more dynamic types of pricing can be applied down to the residential level.

To help utilities navigate through this changing landscape, the Peak Load Management Alliance has developed a series of DR training courses.  The next session, DR Program Design and Implementation, will take place from February 18 to 19, hosted by NV Energy in Las Vegas.  The 2-day course will first cover program development topics like DR program types; how to determine market potential; designing programs and managing portfolios of programs; and calculating cost-effectiveness.  The second day will delve into program implementation strategies and tactics such as staffing and operations; strategic outsourcing; technology architecture and integration; and evaluation, measurement, and verification.

A Visit to the NOC

NV Energy is a pioneer in testing out innovative DR program designs in an extreme climate.  The company has a diverse portfolio of programs that includes a range of applications, along with various flavors of direct load control, dynamic pricing, and DR in combination with energy efficiency programs.  The Las Vegas course will include a visit to NV Energy’s operations center, along with a first-hand look at its DR management system in action.

For utilities considering or being required to implement DR programs (which includes just about every utility today), this is a great opportunity to hear from industry experts and meet peers from across the country to exchange experiences and best practices.  For more information on the course, please click here.

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