Navigant Research Blog

Beyond Energy and Pizza

Benjamin Freas — November 7, 2017

As November rolls through and autumn settles in the Northern Hemisphere, attention quite naturally turns to energy. Not only was October Energy Action month, but the changing of seasons marks a time to reflect on how the built environment consumes energy. As we put our air conditioners away and turn our heaters on, autumn gives us time to reflect: Can we be doing this better?

Indeed, there is near universal consensus that action should be taken to reduce energy intensity and carbon emissions. But taking steps to increase energy efficiency affects far more than just energy costs and greenhouse gases. To explore this concept, let’s look at a theoretical pizza parlor (October was also national pizza month, after all). What energy action should this restaurant take?

Popular Energy Conservation Measures

The first answer is likely an evaluation of HVAC systems. According to the most recent Johnson Controls Energy Efficiency Indicator Survey, investments in HVAC improvements were the most popular energy conservation measure last year. For restaurants, kitchen exhaust can create a substantial cost. Cooking causes grease to splatter and can create odors, steam, and smoke, all of which need to be exhausted out of the kitchen. The wood-burning oven in the pizza parlor, for instance, will need to exhaust all of its smoke out of the restaurant. But replacing this air with conditioned outside air can be expensive, particularly in hot and cold climates.

Air Challenges

Some restaurant owners take a shortcut by shutting off their make-up air unit. This puts the entire restaurant under negative pressure, which forces air to infiltrate in through cracks in doors and windows. Though it may save some on utility bills, it is ultimately a Pyrrhic victory: it creates an unpleasant, drafty environment in the dining room and it could even pull in odors from outside. A far better energy action would be to ensure that ventilation and all HVAC are properly balanced, all equipment is properly maintained, and any old, inefficient equipment is replaced with ENERGY STAR equipment.

Lighting Challenges

After HVAC, lighting should be the next concern. LED retrofits typically provide quick payback in energy savings based on the initial investment. But in addition to energy, lighting (like HVAC) creates the atmosphere of the pizza restaurant. That atmosphere affects patron behavior and will ultimately drive business performance. According to a study published in the Journal of Marketing Research, consumers are more likely to select less healthy food options in restaurants that are dimly lit and healthier options when restaurants are bright. That’s great news for the pizza parlor: by installing dimming controls on lighting, it’s possible to not only cut back on energy, but also drive pizza sales.

The Broad View of Energy

Taking action on energy stretches far beyond utility bills and carbon emissions. Those are noble objectives, but building owners and operators are increasingly looking beyond these effects to justify investment in the built environment. Though simplistic, the pizza parlor example highlights how to improve the customer experience and drive sales with investments in energy action. In reality, a broader set of controls, analytics, and efficient equipment can help many businesses reduce costs and increase revenue.

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