Navigant Research Blog

China’s Cleantech Gap With U.S. Grows

Richard Martin — January 18, 2012

Following the announcement of a major renewables-plus-energy storage project in Hebei Province, the Chinese government has released its “Second National Assessment Report on Climate Change,” which concludes that “global warming fed by greenhouse gases from industry, transport and shifting land-use poses a long-term threat to China’s prosperity, health and food output.”

Among the consequences of climate change in China, the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide, will be declines in grain production of 5 to 20 percent by 2050, “severe imbalances in China’s water resources,” with catastrophic flooding in some areas countered with severe drought in other regions, and increased public health problems from air pollution, particularly in the country’s coal-producing regions.

“China faces extremely grim ecological and environmental conditions under the impact of continued global warming and changes to China’s regional environment,” concludes the 710-page report.

The United States released a similar report, Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States, in 2009, with an update scheduled for 2013. That report’s findings are equally grim, but have mostly been muted by a political environment in which a sizable components of the Republican Party, including all of the candidates for president save the front-runner, Mitt Romney, continue to deny that global warming is even real. We live in interesting times, when the leaders of a nominally Communist government that restricts its citizens’ access to the Internet are more candid and realistic on the issue of global climate change than the leaders of one of the two major political parties in the United States.

China’s efforts to slow climate change also contrast starkly with the near-complete inaction of the U.S. government. China’s struggle to limit the disastrous effects of its burgeoning coal power industry was detailed in this Atlantic feature by James Fallows. “In the search for ‘progress on coal,’ like other forms of energy research and development, China is now the Google, the Intel, the General Motors and Ford of their heyday—the place where the doing occurs, and thus the learning by doing as well,” Fallows wrote.

“You can think of China as a huge laboratory for deploying technology,” a U.S. official posted in China told the Atlantic. China has also moved to the forefront in developing new nuclear power reactors, including liquid-fuel reactors that use thorium, rather than uranium, as their primary fuel, as I detailed in this report on Wired.com.

The “cleantech gap” between China and the United States recalls the so-called “missile gap” between the Soviet Union and America in the late 1950s and early 1960s, a scientific and technological divide that was crystallized by the Sputnik launch. The missile gap turned out to be an invention. The cleantech gap becomes more real by the month. The reasons are manifold, and they include the capability of a command economy, which China’s to a large degree still is, to move quickly on major projects like clean coal and advanced nuclear plants. Free markets are, according to theory, more nimble and responsive than centrally planned ones. But when it takes a decade just to get a permit for a new nuclear plant (much less build one) in the U.S., and a couple of years to go from conception to completion in China, economic theory doesn’t hold up.

China’s climate change dilemma, particularly around increasing use of coal, is stark, and it may not be solved without wrenching environmental and social changes that could tear at the fabric of society. But at least they’re trying to do something about it.

One response to “China’s Cleantech Gap With U.S. Grows”

  1. Donald T Coughlin says:

    The USA has a stock pile of thorium, buried. The US knew China was going to industrialize for maybe a decade and more. Does that mean more usage of the rare minerals would be needed for the Peoples Republic of China and her industrial growth? Maybe. Remember, not long ago, we were pleased to purchase their low cost rare-earths, which put our mines out of business. Wal-Mart and American company with a similar American consumer low ball nature. ([ * ] This courteous space is intentionally prepared for forward thinkers to gripe!) Now for our leadership denying global warming and pursuing an oil war on credit…where were the strategic industrial forward thinking economists in the White House, seeking the reopening the American, Mexican, and Canadian mines to meet expected shortfall in preparation for the Chinese growth. Ah, I do not think so. They were figuring tax cuts. Yes, GWB admitted that Global Warming did exist circa May 2008. What about strategic rare earth industrial metals….
    ChangeItOrDrownIt

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