Navigant Research Blog

Eastern Approaches to Smart Grid Development

Brett Feldman — November 20, 2014

Japan and South Korea have emerged as leaders in smart grid technology development and deployments.  On a recent trip to East Asia, I noted some similarities and some marked differences between the two countries’ approaches and styles.

At Korean Smart Grid Week in Seoul, I spoke about global demand response (DR) trends.  The Expo hall for the conference was as big as any I’ve seen, including large players like Korean Electric Company (KEPCO), Samsung, and LG exhibiting enormous booths and showing off cutting-edge technologies.  There were also a plethora of smaller companies and startups displaying their innovations to challenge the status quo and create the next-generation electric grid.

Next, I traveled to Jeju Island, the so-called “Hawaii of Korea.”  I got to enjoy the palm trees and volcanic landscape only by bus as we traveled to the Smart Grid Information Center, where KEPCO laid out its vision of the grid of the (not too distant) future.

Then we caught a quick ferry ride to tiny Gapa Island, which is only about 1 square mile in size but has an immense amount of solar, wind, and energy storage packed into a microgrid test bed, complete with a state-of-the-art operation center.

All of the Above

Next I embarked for Tokyo.  Japan is undertaking an “all of the above” energy strategy after the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident in 2011.  Restarting the country’s nuclear plants is still on the table, but Japanese companies and government agencies are also deregulating the retail electricity market and designing opportunities for renewables, energy efficiency, DR, and energy storage.

Both countries, and the companies within them, have a laser focus on energy storage as a key solution, which is not surprising given their level of technological advancement.  Grid-scale energy storage is still a few years away in the United States, but Japanese and South Korean vendors are intent on leapfrogging Western suppliers and exporting their expertise.

Hare and Tortoise

The two countries’ business cultures, however, are quite divergent.  South Korean companies tend to take an aggressive, American-style approach to forming a plan, executing on it, and tweaking it along the way.  For instance, the country opened its DR market in November after a relatively short design phase, and U.S. provider EnerNOC has already entered the fray.

Japan, on the other hand, has been studying DR for a few years and it will take a couple more years of pilot programs until the market is ready.  Japanese firms tend to take a much more measured approach to development, trying to perfect the model before setting it free.  In the long term, both methods may work; but in the short term, the real action is in South Korea.

These developments are outlined in the new Navigant Research report, Demand Response for Commercial & Industrial Markets.  The report was actually published while I was abroad, so it includes updates from the trip.

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