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Market Players Split on Energy Efficiency Opt-Out Program Options

Krystal Maxwell — August 31, 2015

Walmart and a group of large energy users within Florida have proposed an opt-out option to Florida’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act. The proposal would allow these large companies to opt out of paying the energy conservation charge. This action would separate these payments and the demand-side management programs, which are both part of the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act. As the Orlando Sentinel reports, Kenneth Baker, a senior manager at Walmart, stated: “We tend to pay into the rebate program … much higher numbers than we get back in rebates. I think that some of the money that we’re now spending on rebates could go towards other energy-efficiency measures.” Walmart is arguing it would have a better impact on energy efficiency measures if it were allowed to take control of these programs—and not be confined by the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act.

Opt-out options of similar programs have been implemented in other states, with an Opt-Out Eligibility put forth by the utility and approved by the utilities commission. In order to opt out of the program in North Carolina, for example, a company must implement alternative energy efficiency measures.

The states that do not offer self direct and opt-out programs include Alabama, Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Washington, D.C., Florida, Georgia, and Hawaii. In Texas, clients develop their own energy efficiency plans if desired and are responsible for the financial impact associated with them. While self direct and opt-out programs have been implemented in other states, there is little information on the successes and failures of such programs.

Opposition

According to Energy Manager Today, Duke, Florida Power & Light (FPL), Tampa Electric, and Gulf Power all oppose the proposal. Their arguments against the proposal are increased costs to small businesses and residential customers. All businesses and residents have the potential to benefit from the programs via the lowering of utility rates, which would be limited if the proposal passed. According to the Tampa Bay Times, FPL argued, “The proposals are self-serving and discriminatory because the thresholds would benefit only select customers.” It would be a detriment to small businesses and residential customers to allow Walmart and other large companies to opt-out of energy efficiency programs. There are no regulations stopping large energy users from investing in additional energy efficiency programs on their own.

If the Public Service Commission in Florida agrees to allow Walmart and other large energy clients to opt out, it seems likely they would provide a self direct program as an alternative, which is common in many other states. While the self direct programs require these companies to provide their own energy efficiency programs, this still leaves the issue of higher costs to small businesses and residential clients who do not qualify to opt out.

The commission is waiting for staff recommendations before making its decision, which will most likely happen in September.


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