• Transportation Efficiencies

Forward Momentum in EV Charging

Lisa Jerram
Feb 07, 2017

Let me join the many analysts writing to declare that “the private sector will move forward with XX energy innovation even if the US federal government stops supporting it.” This insight has gone from a contrarian hot take to conventional wisdom in record time. And it is a perspective that occasionally carries with it a whiff of wishful thinking.

That said, I can offer the projection that the deployment of charging infrastructure to meet the demands of a growing plug-in EV market will be pushed forward by the industry regardless of any changes in federal policy.

There is something to be said for industry stakeholders acting as if they are on their own in pursuing this goal. Not that the US federal government role has not provided momentum for the EV charging market. Federal funding helped fund the first rollout of public charging, though that program’s results were decidedly mixed. Some installations proved to be poor long-term opportunities and poorly maintained. But many others did help form the backbone of a nascent US public charging network.

The US Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Workplace Charging initiative supported significant growth in workplace charging growth from 2014 to 2016. In its Mid-Project Review from December 2015, the DOE reported that “the number of planned and installed charging stations has increased by 70% since June 2014.” Granted, that was from a small installed base initially, but that did amount to over 2,000 stations. Most recently, the DOE collaborated with an effort by the US Department of Transportation to identify a network of locations that can be designated as ready for installing direct current (DC) fast charging.

Moving Forward

The EV market has changed significantly since 2009. Major automakers are planning to offer EVs in multiple segments over the next 5 years. Battery EVs (BEVs) that have over 200 miles of range are coming to market at more moderate price points. Automakers in Europe are already partnering to roll out ultra fast charging infrastructure. In the United States, utilities are waking up to the potential for EVs to provide new revenue.

In this environment, stakeholders are ready to work together to move the US market forward—and there is some benefit to industry not looking at the federal government as a white knight. This can direct focus toward coming up with innovative solutions to challenges like developing business models for the needed public fast charging infrastructure, managing spikes in electricity load, recognizing the potential for demand charges, and educating consumers about EVs in a compelling way, to name a few. If the federal government continues to play a role, that will be a bonus to any industry efforts, but industry seems prepared to take action regardless.