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Look to Islands to Teach Us More about IoT

Neil Strother
Jan 16, 2018

Islands play an important role in the energy sector, and in other sectors. The Hawaiian Islands, for instance, have been a test bed for new technologies at scale, such as rooftop solar and energy storage systems, led by the Hawaiian Electric Company. The concept of islanding, where a distributed energy resource continues to provide power to a location that goes off the grid, has gained stature through the deployment of microgrids. And in the Internet of Things (IoT) realm, both Spain’s Balearic Islands and New Zealand have recently entered the picture as laboratories for IoT technologies.

Case Study: Balearic Islands

Officials in the Balearic Islands are promoting a system involving half a million sensors that will blanket the islands as part of a broad IoT project. The plans call for 50 IoT antennas that can support at least 50,000 sensors. The underlying network infrastructure is based on the emerging LoRa technology, a low power wireless standard for wide area networks that is well-suited for IoT applications.

Several applications for this IoT network are under discussion, from helping tourists identify uncrowded beaches to helping the elderly avoid getting lost. One of the pilot projects uses the network to monitor the availability of some 1,200 parking spaces in a lot at the Balearic Technology Innovation Park.

The Balearic experiment has attracted the attention of Google, which has supplied the local government with its own IoT platform. The online search giant has also brought in its partner Beeva, a Spanish consultancy, to help steer another pilot project that aims to optimize the use of boat moorings in the city of Pollença’s harbor.

Case Study: New Zealand

In New Zealand, similar efforts are underway in that island nation. Telecom carrier Spark is building its own LoRa IoT network, with plans to cover 70% of the population by the middle of 2018. Officials there envision the new network will support connectivity for traffic lights, waterways, and machinery. And they expect to provide such services at lower costs compared to existing infrastructure.

Will these new, island-tested IoT networks prove to be trend-setters? Perhaps. But there are competing IoT network technologies, of course—such as 5G, which has many people in the energy and automotive sectors excited about what it offers (see Navigant Research’s 5G and the Internet of Energy report for some details). No matter how these IoT networks turn out, it pays to keep an eye on the latest advances so one does not get stuck on a technology island.