Navigant Research Blog

What Is a Smart Home and How Will It Play a Role in the Energy Cloud?

— November 3, 2017

The concept of a smart home has the potential to revolutionize the way people interact with their homes. Homes that act intuitively and intelligently through smart home systems can enrich consumers’ lives by fostering increased comfort, awareness, convenience, and cost and energy savings. This concept also extends to the role that the home can play in transitioning the grid from traditional centralized generation to the Energy Cloud.

How Do We Define a Smart Home?

However, there is no set definition of a smart home. The industry often uses the terms smart, connected, and automated interchangeably when referring to the Internet of Things (IoT) in the home, though these terms refer to different (albeit related) ideas. Navigant Research believes the concept of a smart home goes beyond the individual devices of a connected home and involves integrated platforms where an ecosystem of interoperable devices is supported by software and services. A truly smart home should be able to act intuitively and automatically, anticipating and responding to the needs of consumers based on learned lifestyle patterns and real-time interaction.

Navigant Research’s View

Navigant Research believes the comprehensiveness and integration of such solutions are the keys to the success of the smart home, as homes that are embedded with smart technologies at their core are more suitable for playing a role in the Energy Cloud. Homes are expected to transform into dynamic assets that balance home energy production and consumption with distributed energy resources, shed load demand through the optimization of more energy efficient products, respond to signals that shift demand to times when the grid is less strained, and generally support a more reliable grid infrastructure.

Market Focus

Currently, the market is focused on the proliferation of connected devices, which are supporting more digitally enabled, connected homes. Consumers are increasingly aware of smart home technologies, with platforms like the Amazon Echo, Google Home, and Apple HomeKit spurring excitement about controlling devices in the home through voice activation and slowly but surely turning the smart home into a reality. These devices are demonstrating value, whether it be for entertainment, health, convenience, security, or energy. The figure below demonstrates the connected hardware in the home that establishes the backbone for comprehensive integrated platforms that support the development of smarter homes.

Connected Hardware in the Home

(Source: Navigant Research)

A Promising Future

There are many obstacles for the smart home market to overcome, such as interoperability, data privacy and security, a lack of embedded technologies in the home, advanced functionality, and connection between smart technologies and the grid. Yet, this market is gaining traction, and smart home solutions are becoming the future of the home and its role in the digital grid. To learn more about the smart home market, check out the recent Navigant Research report, The Smart Home.

 

Security Proves to Be a Strong Proposition for the Smart Home

— October 17, 2017

Nest has long been known as the Google-backed consumer products company responsible for the innovative and sleek Nest Learning Thermostat. The company has had a fairly limited selection of consumer products for years. It only expanded upon its original thermostat with the Nest Protect smoke detector in 2013 and the Nest Indoor and Outdoor Cams in 2015 and 2016 to bring its total portfolio to four wholly original devices.

Because the company is slow to unveil new products, any hardware releases from Nest are major news. So when Nest announced six new products last week, it made a big splash in the consumer electronics industry. However, the sheer volume of products in this latest announcement is not the most significant part of this news. Rather, it’s the fact that these products are all security related.

Smart Technology Adoption Is Increasing

Nest’s new product rollout emphasizes the growing importance of security as a value proposition for the adoption of smart home technologies. In the United States, consumers are adopting smart technologies through security providers to help increase awareness of what is going on in their homes and feel more secure and protected.

Security systems no longer include only an alarm system and sensors that monitor when a home’s perimeter is breached, but also include connected cameras, door locks, door bells, and garage door openers. These devices create an ecosystem that monitors the home in and out and can help optimize and automate the operations of a home.

Comcast’s Security Offerings

Nest isn’t the only company engaging in the smart home space through security. Comcast has increasingly become involved in the smart home space through its Xfinity Home security service. The company has invested in home automation through its acquisition of iControl and its partnership with Whisker Labs and is utilizing its existing infrastructure and resources to move further into the security and home automation business.

These moves allow Comcast to create new streams of revenue as some of its traditional business models come under threat, like its cable TV business. Vivint Smart Home is another company offering home security and automation products and services, and already has a video monitoring package similar to what Nest has just announced, alongside a suite of other smart technologies likes its Element smart thermostat.

Value Propositions and Consumer Benefits

There are many different value propositions for the smart home outside of security, including energy, comfort and convenience, automation, and health and wellness. The home energy management space was one of the first to introduce smart home technologies, including smart thermostats, but now there are different value propositions for smart home technologies by region. In the United States, security has prevailed, while energy is still the most popular in Europe.

These value propositions help demonstrate to consumers the benefits of smart technologies and how they can significantly affect their lives. Smart technologies for security can help consumers protect themselves and their families, and energy devices can help consumers save money on their energy bills and contribute to a greener planet. This helps drive the adoption of smart technologies and push the concept of a smart home closer to reality.

 

As Security Threats to IoT Grow, So Do New Solutions and Regulations

— October 10, 2017

Good reasons abound for concerns about the vulnerability of the electric grid to cyber attacks. Likewise, enterprises must confront serious security risks as a growing number of firms adopt industrial IoT (IIoT) technologies. Consumers risk potential hacks as they install IoT gadgets such as smart thermostats or voice-activated devices like Amazon’s Echo in their homes.

Scary Stories

Recent stories paint a dark picture of these risks. A story about Industroyer—a modular malware likened to the notorious Stuxnet worm—sends a sobering message. The story’s author, Robert Lipovsky, says, “Industroyer poses a big threat to industrial systems because it doesn’t exploit any vulnerabilities,” and that its four payload components “are designed to gain direct control of switches and circuit breakers at an electricity distribution substation.” Also, the malware can be reconfigured to attack other energy infrastructures and other industries like manufacturing or transportation.

In the broader realm of well-known Bluetooth technology, the story is much the same. An IoT security firm called Armis has uncovered critical flaws in Bluetooth implementations that could affect up to 5.3 billion devices. The Armis researchers have named this threat vector BlueBorne. So far, nothing untoward has been reported in terms of hacks, and Armis is working with Apple, Microsoft, Google, and Linux developers to quietly coordinate the release of patches to stop potential attacks. But left unchecked, attackers could theoretically take over Bluetooth devices or commandeer their Internet traffic.

Products to Protect against Threats

Despite these ominous stories, technology vendors have new products aimed at reducing security threats. Intel, for example, has a new process called Secure Device Onboarding to ensure a more secure deployment of connected devices for enterprises. The idea is to help industrial customers safely and quickly install IoT devices, such as lighting, sensors, and gateways. The company is working across the ecosystem to help push this new level of security and boost IoT adoption.

Similarly, Cisco is touting enhanced routers for utility customers with security at their core. Executives from Cisco report that security is top of mind for utility and other enterprise customers in the face of the latest cyber threats, and the company is responding to this this demand.

Policy Adaptation

Elected officials in the United States also see the threat to IoT devices, and are pushing new legislation. A bipartisan group of senators has proposed a new IoT Cybersecurity Improvement Act of 2017, which is still working its way toward approval. The law, if enacted, could be one more key driver toward a safer IoT and IIoT world.

In the face of potential IoT-related threats, it might be easy to see only the dark side. To be sure, connected devices are more vulnerable than non-connected ones. Nonetheless, leading IoT vendors, their customers, and even legislators are taking real steps to hinder harmful attacks. This means that the situation has a bright side, too.

 

Installation and Customer Support Play Vital Role in Creating Smarter Homes

— August 10, 2017

The novelty of having a smart home is driving connected device adoption among consumers, but the novelty is wearing off as the concept of a smart home becomes a reality. The smart home market, however, still has a long way to go before it reaches mainstream adoption. One of the major issues this market faces is that many consumers do not understand the value of connected devices. Many customers avoid the market entirely or exchange smart devices for dumb counterparts due to premium prices and installation challenges.

Providers Exploring New Methods

This is an issue that smart home technology providers are trying to tackle by providing additional support to customers. For example, Vivint and Best Buy recently announced a partnership to roll out Vivint employees in more than 400 Best Buy stores around the country. The Vivint employees will be able to give customers advice about smart home devices and even provide installation services. Vivint has traditionally sold its solutions through a direct-to-home approach. The company believes its partnership with Best Buy further develops this approach and its core belief in consultative sales—or human interaction to explain how smart home technologies actually work in the home. This move may help increase adoption by not only providing customers with more support and information, but also making smart home solutions more visible and accessible through availability at a large retailer.

Vivint and Best Buy are not the only companies exploring this method. Amazon is taking a similar approach to increasing smart home customer support by preparing an in-house fleet of experts to offer free Alexa consultations, professional in-home installations of smart home devices, and Wi-Fi networking systems. The fleet, which is part of Amazon Home Services, has been compared to that of Best Buy’s Geek Squad and is currently available to consumers in Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, San Diego, Los Angeles, Orange County, and San Jose.

Professional installation is not an entirely new concept in the smart home space. For example, Comcast requires its Xfinity solutions be professionally installed. It has expanded further into the space with its recent acquisition of iControl, new combination Wi-Fi router smart home hubs, and voice-activated remotes, which can control connected lighting.

Installations Are Key to the Integrated Smart Home

Professional installations and enhanced customer support are key to transitioning the smart home from an early adopter’s market to mainstream. They will also play a role in creating more dynamic, integrated homes that can play a role in a more digitized grid. Though there is no specific definition for a smart home, Navigant Research believes the more integrated connected devices become with the home, the more likely the home can be used for additional purposes like shedding load and stabilizing the grid.

Currently, the market is focused on standalone systems, point solutions, and further developing interoperability between devices to form greater connected ecosystems. However, players like Vivint, Best Buy, Amazon, and Comcast are progressing the reality of the smart home by offering more comprehensive, integrated solutions with professional installations and enhanced customer support.

 

Blog Articles

Most Recent

By Date

Tags

Clean Transportation, Digital Utility Strategies, Electric Vehicles, Energy Technologies, Policy & Regulation, Renewable Energy, Smart Energy Practice, Smart Energy Program, Transportation Efficiencies, Utility Transformations

By Author


{"userID":"","pageName":"Smart Homes","path":"\/tag\/smart-homes","date":"12\/11\/2017"}